Reclaiming Our Living Room

We’re in the mountains of Maine today reclaiming our sanity, which has given me some time to edit some photos and catch up on some posts. I have to tell you guys how relaxing this is. I’m sitting in a rocking chair, in front of a wood stove, in a stream of sun, with a mug of hot tea. To say this is nice is an understatement. So while we reclaim a sense of balance and relief at being away from renovations for a couple days, let’s talk about our reclaimed southern pine floors we put down in our living room.

Flooring (22)These floors are my dream floors. The beautiful variation, the saw marks—count me in. They are the type of floor you see on Houzz and keep as an inspiration piece. They are floors you look up price wise and, when you’re on a budget like ours, gasp and fall over sideways when you see the cost. They are also the floors which my husband managed to divert from the waste stream.

Because of how this floor is laid, when all is said and done there’s a decent amount of waste. When Andy saw this he realized there was enough to do the floor in our living room, floor the small space in front of the new stairs and maybe, just maybe, build a someday farmers table for our someday porch—and keep these extra pieces out of the dump. So of course, it came home.

It was his first wedding anniversary gift to me and to say I was delighted would be a gross understatement.

We had been keeping this flooring in our barn for months on end, so it was important to bring it into the house to acclimate before we laid it. It was a little more organized than this (the day we started laying it) but more or less there were piles of flooring everywhere. My shins are direct proof of these piles. You would have thought at some point I would have learned to step over or walk around the piles instead of directly into them. Lesson not learned.

Flooring (5)When it came to laying this flooring it definitely took time. Unlike regular flooring, with reclaimed flooring you have to match widths, sometimes you have to fix splines, and in general it can be a little frustrating to line up. To make it easier for us I decided we needed to pile all of the flooring by width so we could easily grab what we needed. The boards ranged from 6″ to 12″ so there was definitely a huge amount of variation. It was much more efficient versus our original layout kind of seen above and below. In other words it was not the most efficient method.

Flooring (13)To start laying the floor we needed to make a border around our concrete hearth. Andy took two of the shorter and narrower width pieces, put a 45 degree angle on each and laid them on either side of the hearth. They were held together in with biscuits and secured to the subfloor with construction adhesive and finish nails through the face (top) of the flooring. One of the advantages of a floor like this is that you either will never notice the finish nails, or they look like part of the original product.

Flooring (4)Laying the first course of flooring was pretty much like any other flooring—start in the center. To do this easily we found the center on each wall with a measuring tape, marked it, and use a chalk line to connect the two center marks.

The next step shows why this flooring takes longer than other types. With most flooring you can grab whatever works and lay it, as they are all the same width. With this type of flooring it was vitally important for us to lay every board for our rows out ahead of time for two reasons:

  • We needed to ensure we had enough of the same width to create the entire row.
  • We needed to ensure the great variations in the wood would look visually appealing when put together. A very clean red piece of wood could either look great, or horrible, next to a darker very marked up piece of wood. In floors like this they don’t need to perfectly match because in the end we wanted a varied look. There were a few times however we swapped pieces out because they just looked wonky.

Once test laid, we had to ensure the butt ends (where the two boards meet up end to end) would sit flush so we cut the ends off to make them square.

Once we had a chalk line on the floor we followed that line with our boards while making sure the flooring was centered, and not to the left or right of the line. To secure this type of flooring we glued it down and biscuit jointed on the the butt ends.

Flooring (3)After the floor is laid and we were sure it was centered, we braced it on one side. We did this with scraps screwed into the subfloor firmly against the non-tongue side (but not so tight it bowed the flooring). This is so when we installed one side we didn’t throw the flooring off kilter from the original straight row. Flooring (11)From here it was a matter of laying everything. Some of the boards weren’t perfect on the edges so they needed to be planed down a little, some needed to be stood on in order for them to slide in easier, and some of them worked perfectly. It was important not only to lay down our rows prior to securing it, but to also test fit the pieces too.

Flooring (6) Flooring (8)With the test fits complete, we banged each piece into place (using a scrap piece of wood, not hitting the actual flooring) and nailed it securely. Andy used his pneumatic flooring nailer, but there are plenty of just fine regular ones too—you just have to hit them harder.

Flooring (10)Once we finished a few courses we removed the blocks we initially secured against the first course and kept on going in the other direction.

Flooring (12)With the easier of the two sides done (to the left of the hearth from the direction in the photo above) it was time to tackle the right side. It wasn’t particularly harder, but it did require just a little more work.

Flooring (14)The first row we laid on this side was the most complex. We had to both secure it to the hearth, and attach it to the original course. To tie into the hearth side, we used the biscuit jointer to pull everything together. The issue was the original course had the groove where we needed a tongue. Why was this a problem? This meant only one thing—a spline.

A spline is a thin piece of wood inserted into the groove of flooring to turn it into a tongue. Since we needed our center board to have two tongues, a spline was the only way to do it. I didn’t get any great picture of a spline, but if you look in the photo above there is a thin piece of wood sitting on the concrete hearth—that’s a spline. They can be bought, but Andy made ours on the table saw with some scrap wood. To put in the spline we glued it into place and then finish nailed, and then set the nails, to secure it and to make sure the nails were flush so the next piece of flooring would actually fit.

After this part I didn’t get many more photos of day one. We were getting to the final courses laid on this side, we were hungry, and we were in the last push for the night.

The next day however, we got up early and started again. Andy’s friend stopped by with his black lab and while they chatted they laid the last course. His buddy is also in construction and builds furniture too so it was great to have him stop in to inject some energy, and help, into the final push.

Flooring (19)When all was said and done, and a day and a half of work later, we had a beautiful floor.

Flooring (20)There was much rejoicing and dancing.

Flooring (21)

We’ve had this floor laid for about a week or so now and it grows on us more and more each day. There was something off though and we weren’t sure what it was until it hit us. The thing with our house is that we’re going to have a lot of different flooring. We’re keeping the oak in the original house, we’ll have beech upstairs as well as beech on the staircase and in the downstairs bedroom, and we have the beautiful reclaimed floors in our living room. When we stepped back we realized the reclaimed floor just wasn’t tying together. It looked great, but we needed it somewhere else so it looked like it was on purpose and not just an after thought. That’s when we realized we had enough to lay in front of the stairs and how well it would bring everything together.

While we are going to finish the staircase first, we laid a few boards and I’m happy to say it totally fixes the balance issue. With the wide living room and the small amount in front of the staircase it looks great together and looks purposeful.

Flooring (1)We’re very happy with the floors so far, and frankly, everything. The house is pulling together so nicely and we love it.

I’ll be back next week with an update of all the little things we’ve been doing including higher-quality photos of the lighting we installed, new lighting we’ve put in since, paint in the staircase and more.

With all that said, I’m checking out and am going to head out into the woods. We’re going to go tap some trees to try and get a little more maple sap before the season is over, cut some wood, and spend the day with family cooking over a fire outside and having fun in the snow.

xo,

Heather

I Saw The Light, And it Opened Up My Eyes, I Saw The Light

Did you just flash back to the Ace of Base years? I did, almost constantly, while we were installing lights. I’m pretty sure those aren’t the lyrics but that’s what my brain kept singing over. and over. and over.

You’re welcome.

So first let me just say I just realized I haven’t posted since March 14th. I want you to know I am NOT going anywhere, nor did I realize it had been that long. I swore I wrote a post on the flooring we put down. Then I remembered I still had the photos to edit for the post, hence no post last week. Holla for being super organized at work and then losing my brain at home. Son of a bee sting.

So here’s what’s been going on in the last few weeks:

  • Andy milled two different trims for the windows and put them up so we could choose.
  • Andy has been milling our staircase parts and daaammmnn do they look good. Right now we’re doing a beech/walnut staircase with painted ballusters (the same Dover White as the living room and stairwell area).
  • We painted the stairwell area Dover White except for the accent wall, which will still likely be the sea salt color we used in one of the upstairs bedrooms.
  • We laid our reclaimed pine flooring. It was a process but very worth it.
  • We’re laying the same reclaimed pine flooring  leading up to the new staircase.
  • We’re decided if there is enough pine flooring left (someday down the line) we’re going to build a farmers table we can put outside to have wonderful outdoor meals around with friends.
  • We wired!

The last point is what this entire blog post is about, though many of those other items will be getting their own post too. I promise. Not empty promise, real promise.  So let’s delve into the electricity (but not literally). Heads up—my nice camera died so these are all iPhone pictures. Once again, you are welcome.

First, remember this:

NoLineEvahOkay, maybe he’s referring to fallen electricity lines from the poles but a hot wire is a hot wire. Don’t touch that shiz unless you like being six feet under, or having tingly arms and legs and neurological problems for the rest of your life. Or just being zapped. It’s like touching an electrical containment fence for a cow times about a million, and a cow fence hurts. Don’t ask how I know. It has nothing to do enjoying a beverage or three at a relatives wedding and leaning on one without thinking.

In other words – keep the electricity off while you’re working with it. I joke around, but seriously. Also keep in mind while you’re reading this that I’m vague for a reason. Neither Andy are I are electricians. While Andy is more than capable of hooking up a light or switch, etc. we’re still not giving out electrical advice. Mistakes happen and I don’t want it to be from our words. Safety pep talk complete.

When Andy first wired our home and ran the wires to the panel, he made sure he marked each one so he knew exactly where they were coming from. This little detail made our most recent step infinitely easier. The first step was taking the wires for the two bedrooms and the stairwell and hooking them up to the panel.

ElectricalHookup (7) ElectricalHookup (6) ElectricalHookup (5)Now, once you’ve seen one electrical switch/plug/light hookup you’ve sort of seen them all so let’s discuss how we did the hookup in our guest bedroom upstairs. To start this is a really tall ceiling so we had some high-rolling staging we were working on. Andy is not just balancing in an incredibly uncomfortable position in the photo below; he is firmly planted on two feet. I can promise you any man who would be balancing like that on a beam would not be non-chalantly putting together a light. So many jokes. I refrain.

ElectricalHookup (12)Get ready to get your minds blown at how difficult this is.

1.) Determine light length, cut to length, splice cable, pull out wires and remove sheathing from tip of wires.

ElectricalHookup (13)2.) Attach fixture to electrical box.

ElectricalHookup (14)

ElectricalHookup (16)3.) Match up wires and put wire nuts on them. All nutted up? Tuck those wires up into the box. Don’t jam them in there, just tuck them in there. (So many bad bad jokes. Deep breath. Deep breath.)

ElectricalHookup (20)4.) Screw the ceiling plate on. Or whatever that piece is called. Very technical.

ElectricalHookup (1)5.) Admire!

ElectricalHookup (2)Let’s discuss the elephant in the room, or rather the mouse if we’re making a size comparison to what I’m about to say. We knew when we started that this light is simply too small for this room. Scale wise it’s way off, but cost wise it was perfect. I.E. it was free. In fact, both bedroom lights I’ll be showing you were free. My husband is a master of salvaging items. I admit that while I like the upper part I’m a little “eh” about the actual shade. Hopefully down the line we can replace the shade with something larger and in charger. Much like Scott Baio.

There’s one other thing I’ll point out. Obviously those beams create crazy shadows. The shop light below them demonstrates this perfectly. I’d say this is the only disadvantage of having exposed beams, the crazy light situation. The light in each bedroom is centered, which means it hangs directly above a beam. This downside to this is crazy beam shadows everywhere, and the inability to hang a light too low. The positive side is that, uhm, the beams are still the focus? And it’s centered so it looks weighted correctly? Let’s go with those silver linings. Me being me, I would rather have my light centered and deal with beam shadows then have it off-centered and have it hang between two beams off kilter. If you are planning on having exposed beams, plan for this. Andy has been asking me if we should put up track lighting for months now and I am adament against it. After seeing the shadows for  myself he said, “Are you ready for track lighting yet?” To which I squinted my eyes, looked around, and said “No!”.

Stubborn much?

Though we may do some sort of track lighting below the beams in the future the truth is we’re honestly lamp people. I much prefer lamp light to overhead light. We’ll play with that idea first and hopefully the combination of overhead light + lamp light will help. If not, maybe (a big maybe) I will consider track lighting. Knowing me, we’ll eventually do it and then I’ll be all “I LOVE THIS. WHY DIDN’T WE DO THIS EARLIER” to which Andy will be all *face-palm*.

It’s how we roll.

SO enough chatter, let’s discuss our master bedroom light which I adore beyond reason. Let me set this up by saying this light was salvaved from a house which was slated to be destroyed. This light would have been a casualty had we not saved it. Again, it was free. Sparing the uber informative and intellectually stimulating description of how to install a light above, let’s just look at the light.

ElectricalHookup (10)Ohhh no.

ElectricalHookup (9)Ohhh yes.

ElectricalHookup (11)I love everything about you. (And you too, Andy. I love everything about you too.) This light is the bees knees to me. It’s the peanut butter to my jelly. It’s the jam to my ham. Wait, I don’t think that last one works…or maybe it does *contemplative thought of the day*. Whatever your favorite combination is, this is it to me. This light also casts these odd shadows all over the walls but I have to say I love it. No photo captures it properly so unfortunately I have nothing to show it. Maybe once my nice camera is recharged up I’ll be able to snag one, but for now, just trust me. I don’t know why I like it, but I do, and that’s all that matters.

I’ll be back in another post to show you, with proper photos, these lights again as well as our $30 staircase light.

We’re breaking the bank I tell you, breaking it. Though I’m pretty sure the banking system is already broken. On that note, I think it’s time for this blog post to be over. I refuse to segway into banking regulation discussions. Primarily because I would rather eat ham and jam.

Also because….boring.

How do you like that segway?

xo,

Heather

P.S. Thank you for tolerating my sub-par writing in this post and attrocious grammar/train-of-thought/segways. You’re all awesomesaucesome. Is that still a thing? Saying awesomesauce? I feel like it’s not. I also feel like it maybe never was really a thing to begin with. *contemplative thought of the day number two*.

Sand Sand Sand Senora, Sanding All The Time

Sometimes you just have to throw a little Harry Belefonte out there. Especially when you’re doing a ton of sanding and the song keeps getting stuck in your head with “sand” instead of “shake” because you’re especially weird like that.

Weirdness accepted, we making more and more progress on the house and my arms are oh my God so ripped now—if by “ripped” I mean “weak and sore”.  With the bedrooms painted we needed to sand down the exposed beams before sealing them. We are keeping them au natural instead of gussying them up like so many people do (so many jokes to be had about keeping things au natural). Jokes aside since my grandma reads this, before we started sanding the beams were kind of dull and had a little mold on them, which happens (it’s no big deal, there are literally mold spores everywhere). Instead of painting them which would make it almost impossible to undo, we really wanted to sand them to a bright wood tone in order to bring out the grain.

Before we dry-walled, we sanded each beam on the ends but saved the rest of the sanding until we had finished painting. In order for you to see the before and after, I sanded the closest beam below and the others are all sanded on either end but un-sanded in the middle. See how much prettier the wood is where it’s sanded?

DSC_2381-01 DSC_2383-01Using rolling staging (sort of seen in the photo above) I used an orbital sander and 100 grit sandpaper. On the tougher spots I used 80 grit sandpaper to remove more material. Because we’re not staining them and because they are up high it’s almost impossible to see any marks left by an 80 grit paper from regular standing level (they’re almost impossible to see when you’re right up close to them too). I would be hesitant to sand with anything below 120 grit however if you’re going to stain, unless you do a low-grit sand paper followed by a high-grit. Sanding the sides wasn’t difficult but oh my muscles was the bottom to each of them tiring. Instead of holding the sander over my head, which is also dangerous, I found the easiest way was to almost hug the beam from the top and hold the sander. Instead of pushing from the bottom, I was pulling from the top which made it easier to hold for long periods of time. When all was said and done each beam looked light, airy and you could see the beautiful wood grain patterns in each beam.

DSC_2395-01 DSC_2394-01We still have seven more beams to sand (two in the stairwell and five in the other bedroom, but we’re happy with the progress. Everything is definitely pulling together.

Since it’s somewhat obvious in the photos, we finally painted the master bedroom! While we have to admit the color is pretty, it’s so close to white that when it’s sunny in there you can’t tell it’s painted until you notice the ceiling is bright white. We really thought it was going to be a soft gray but it’s one of those colors that’s very malleable (more than most) in different lighting. In our bedroom with all the sunlight it looks like a white with a hint of beige and gray.

DSC_2379-01It’s odd that the paint on the walls looks slightly different than the paint on the chip and yet, the paint when on the chip dries to look just like the chip. Believe it or not, the first chip of the center strip above has the paint on it. The strip is clearly a gray, while in our room the walls look like a milky white.

All of that said, we’re okay with it for now. It’s definitely a pretty color but we’re planning on repainting down the line (maybe a couple years) to give it a little more saturated color. Then again, we might completely love it as is once we decorate around it! If we change, we’ll be sure to let you know. In the mean time—more sanding!

xo,

Heather

Our Dyed Concrete Hearth & Lessons Learned

When it came to a wood stove hearth in our new living room we knew we wanted something that would hold up but was also sleek. Oh, and it had to be affordable and easy. We simply didn’t have the money for a big slab of granite, slate, or anything similar. We also really didn’t want tile. We had been eying dyed concrete for a while for the kitchen counters but decided to give this a go first. Though Andy had poured huge slabs before, we had never poured a small slab…in our house…dyed…in winter.

I’m going to be up front when I say ours didn’t turn out perfectly. We had a dusting issue, which admittedly kind of stinks but things happen, you know? I’ll explain more below. This issue had to do with after it’s poured though, and not how we mixed it. All said, this was a good “test run” so to say about what we can do better if we do concrete counters.

The first thing Andy did was mark out where we wanted the hearth on the floor so we could assess if it fit our needs. We always prop our winter boots next to the stove, and like to stand next to it too on the hearth, so we knew it had to be big enough for more than just the stove.

DSC_2094-01Once we had a general idea of the layout, Andy cut the wood a little longer than we drew out just to make sure we liked it. We decided we really didn’t want it any longer so he cut the wood to length and adhered a construction grade plastic to one side of the wood to make a concrete form. The plastic would allow the form to release later on, instead of have the concrete adhere to it during curing.

DSC_2125-01DSC_2127-01Once we had the form in place we put some painters tape in a level line to the form. Side note here: You will want to keep a wet cloth on hand. As you pour the mix, it may splatter. We had no issues with it dying our wall which was pretty great. Score one for the Sherwin-Williams eggshell paint, it was super easy to clean. If however you are concerned, I would recommend taping up some thin plastic above your pour line to minimize splatters on the wall. No matter what, you should expect some bleeding up the wall. You may be able to wash this right off, you may have to touch up that area of your wall with paint.

DSC_2139-01When it comes to concrete you need to follow the directions for mixing, and curing to ensure it turns out properly.

DSC_2073-01For our dye we decided to go with a black from Direct Colors, Inc. in hopes it would turn out dark gray.

DSC_2090-01We used a scale for weight, versus a measuring cup because it’s important to ensure each batch has the same ratios to have a uniform color. To get our ratios we just followed the directions that came with the dye for how much per pound of cement, and measured it out in a container that I tared to zero before each weighing.

DSC_2136-01After mostly mixing the cement and aggregate you want to slowly sprinkle in the color while you finish mixing. It was hard to get photos, but the mixing/dying process looked something like this (one of the mixing photos is after we poured a few batches already, ignore that).

DSC_2172-01 DSC_2176-01 DSC_2132-01 DSC_2138-01 DSC_2217-01 DSC_2218-01 DSC_2219-01 DSC_2145-01Once you have everything mixed pour slowly. We didn’t put a protective plastic sheet up so instead once we realized there were splatters we improvised. As Andy poured I held the cardboard at a few inches back from the tip of the wheelbarrow and a few inches off the ground. Success.

DSC_2220-01To make the slab itself we poured a few batches, followed by re-bar, followed by a few more batches.

DSC_2179-01 DSC_2189-01 DSC_2192-01 DSC_2195-01 DSC_2199-01 DSC_2207-01 DSC_2213-01Then came smoothing everything out and running a level over the top to get the water off the top while ensuring a level surface to the slab. Once everything was level we took a sander, minus sandpaper, and vibrated the form and the floor to release any air pockets throughout. This process will also bring water to the surface.

DSC_2226-01 DSC_2234-01This is where we may have hit our snag. Once we finished vibrating we troweled the surface smooth. The only thing we can think of to cause the dusting was we troweled the water back into the surface layer. There are a few reasons dusting can occur, but the only one that made sense in our setting was excess water being worked back into the surface. Lesson learned.

As the slab cured (concrete is cured through a chemical reaction, not drying the water out) it wasn’t just dark gray, it was black. I mean really, really, black. It sort of grew on us and we really liked it with the flooring we would be putting down.

DSC_2239-01As it kept curing over the next 48 hours it started getting lighter and lighter. Eventually it cured to a medium gray. While not the dark gray we intended, or the black that we ended up really liking, the medium gray was still darker than a natural concrete slab and will still be nice against the reclaimed pine floors we’ll be laying.

DSC_2348-01It was about this time we started seeing an issue. When we ran our finger across the top it came up with a dust (hence the name, dusting). Once the dust was blown away we were left with a patch of rough material. Womp womp.

DSC_2369-01We put some spray sealer on but realized this wasn’t going to fix the rest of it from dusting. So that said, we’ve come up with a solution. We are going to take a concrete grinder and grind it down. Instead of looking like a slate slab, it will have smooth exposed aggregate which will give it a salt and pepper look. Overall it should still look nice when done, and I’ll definitely blog about it once we do it. In other words, we’re still turning it into something still nice—and we’ve learned something valuable for our kitchen counters if we decide to go with concrete.

When your cake comes out broken, mash that cake in with frosting, roll them in balls, put them in chocolate, put a stick in them and call them cake pops. Just like you intended.

Who wanted a smooth slab anyway?

xo,

Heather

Who Needs The Gym When You Can Paint

I admit I haven’t been to the gym since November, and I just finished eating girl scout cookies. Judge away. So while I’ve been eating cookies and not exercising, I have been painting and I entirely forgot just how much exercise painting is. Or maybe it’s not and I’m that out of shape, but I felt it in my arms, shoulders, and abs. That said, I really should get back to the gym…juuuusstt after I finish this next cookie.

So while I wipe the crumbs off my keyboard let me tell you about this whole painting thing. Despite my sarcastic very serious blog post here on choosing a paint color, I have to say that once we chose the living room color the rest of the paint pallet for the house came together easily. I know the big thing in design are either these bright funky colors and patterns or very cottage like. I had to put aside all these design ideas all over blogs, tv, etc. and decide what I liked. What we liked. It came down to this: We both like color, but we both like muted color. The colors that we can easily change the decor and not have to repaint. The colors that will enhance the beautiful wood work and custom features in the house instead of compete with it. We also wanted to really stick to as few colors as possible. So our paint pallet for the house ended up being this:

DSC_2291All of the colors we chose were Sherwin-Williams. It’s our preference paint first because it’s good, but as mentioned a long time ago in a full disclosure we have access to it at an affordable price because of the industry my husband is in. Honestly though, I would likely buy it anyway even if we didn’t. I think everyone just has the paint they are comfortable with and for us it’s Sherwin-Williams.  I also really love that the Promar-200 (contractor paint) is VOC free. It makes painting in the winter tolerable and dare I say, pleasurable?

The first area of painting was our living room, which is Dover White (SW 6385). It’s a white that is warm with slightly yellow undertones but barely so. We chose it because we decided to have a nice range of cool and warm colors throughout the house to keep it balanced. This color will also go throughout the entire open kitchen area once we renovate the original house, and is also in our staircase area primarily. It’s the “overall” color of the house I guess you could say.

DSC_2306As with most paint colors, it changes dependent on light and the area it’s in. The staircase showcases this well. On the underside it looks like a warm white, but on the flat wall without the direct light it looks more yellow. DSC_2036-01In the room just to the left of this staircase we decided to go with Realist Beige (SW 6078). It’s a beautiful warm light brown. I had always been against any color that said “beige” in it, but I’m really happy with this. Truth be told, if I hadn’t been trying to match the leftover Edgecomb Gray we had from a previous paint project (Benjamin Moore color, color matched to Behr paint) I wouldn’t have chosen it simply because I wouldn’t have been able to picture it on a wall and I would have had trouble with the name beige. Consider me a convert I guess because this color is truly beautiful on the wall.

DSC_2305The photo below shows the slight contrast between the Edgecomb Gray in the closet, and the Realist Beige on the walls. In natural light it’s almost a light brown with a grayish undertone but still warm, but when the artificial light hits it (like the photo of the swatch above) it becomes a beautifully warm brown. Either way it’s a really pretty satisfying color and most definitely the dark horse.

DSC_2103-01In the upstairs bedrooms we decided to go with cool tones, using a light gray for the master bedroom called Eider White (SW 7014). It’s similar to the Reflection color we used last year in the original part of the house right before our appraisal, but it’s a warmer gray. I always think of gray as being slightly cool no matter what but I guess it’s the warmer of the non-beige gray tones {I feel like I’m making no sense, but hopefully you get what I mean}.  We originally were going to stick with Reflection but I decided I wanted a gray that was a little less blue so Eider White it was. I have yet to paint the master bedroom, but on the swatch and in the can it looks like the perfect gray. Cross your fingers!

DSC_2303For the last two areas of the addition we decided to use the same color, called Sea Salt (SW 6204). Andy mentioned wanting to do an accent color on the back wall of our tall staircase to give it a little dimension but we didn’t want something bold. As well, I really wanted a soft calming color in the other upstairs bedroom which will be the guest bedroom for now but eventually a nursery. We both thought it would work well to have these two areas be the same color and to help keep the two areas of the house cohesive and tied together.

DSC_2304This is without a doubt my favorite color of the bunch. I had been eying it for months and kept coming back to it. I showed my Mom and she laughed because it is apparently the same color she painted the downstairs of her house. This color has the most change between natural and artificial light going from an almost steely gray with very slight green undertones to a warmish blue-green (like the photos below). That description does it no justice but I highly recommend it. It’s gorgeous.

DSC_2312DSC_2308Overall we’re happy, but I’m also relieved I have a general paint pallet to go off of when we re-do the original house which takes some stress off. We may not use the exact colors here (except in the kitchen/open area which will be Dover White) but they will either be from the same pallets or complementary pallets.

As far as the addition goes here are the next steps:

  • Paint the master bedroom
  • Paint a second coat in the upstairs and downstairs bedrooms
  • Paint the stairwell
  • Finish the electrical hookups in the entire addition
  • Lay the flooring
  • Build the staircase including treads, posts, balusters, etc.
  • Sand the beams in the upstairs bedrooms
  • Seal the beams (we’re not painting or staining)
  • Trim the doors, windows and flooring out

Now, where are those cookies?

xo,

Heather

P.S. I have a Public Service Announcement: Eat the lemonade Girl Scout cookies you haven’t. If you’re as lemon flavor obsessed as I am, including fake lemon flavor (it’s a guilty pleasure), you will not regret it.