Wild Ideas: Autumn Olive

A few weeks ago the dogs and I were out at the apple trees in the back field when I noticed Primrose eating tiny red berries that had spots on them.

I was concerned because normally small round red berries = bad. At least, that’s how I was raised. So I came in the house (oddly calmly, I think at this point I just expect things like this from her sweet little face) and tried to figure out if little miss trouble maker had just poisoned herself. After a bunch of googling around I found out the berries were called Autumn Olives.

Not only are the berries not poisonous to either dogs or humans (or cats and horses apparently), they are actually a superfood secret and they make very good juice, jam and fruit leather. Excuse me?! Say what?! I’ve had a zero effort harvest in my backyard for five years and I never knew about it? Let me clarify that these, despite the name, are not olives. Rather, they are a tart berry filled with lycopene (cancer fighting) and antioxidants. They have pits but I haven’t had a problem just eating them. It turns out Autumn Olives are an invasive species in North America, but as I figure it invasive can simply mean opportunistic. I’m into permaculture and if it’s growing wild, and I can harvest it, why not? It’s the same reason I made dandelion syrup this spring, wild stuffed grape leaves this summer and harvested wild blackberries and raspberries.

According to multiple sources on the internet the berries get ripe best in cool weather, and even when they seem ready they normally aren’t until the end of September to mid-October. I found them around the beginning of September and let me tell you with how much anticipation I’ve been waiting for them to be ready to harvest: a ton. Thursday was the day. I went out, tasted a berry and it was still tart but not painfully so. It was, dare I say, tasty. I knew the birds would be out to get these soon so I got my big tin pail and walked out to gather about 5lbs of berries per a jam recipe I found.

Here’s a few tips on harvesting the berries:

  • Put the pail below each stem and then gently roll the berries off of their stems with your fingers. If they don’t come off easily don’t force them. Ripe berries will easily roll off.  The juice of these comes out easily as well, gentle gentle gentle.
  • You will get spiders and other creatures from the plant in your berries. That’s harvesting for you. I try and pick them out with care because I know they are beneficial to the plant life.
  • About a 1/4 of a five gallon bucket hit about 5lbs for me.
  • Share your harvest. In other words: these are wild. Other animals besides you eat them too. Don’t take them all. I took a very small portion of what was there and left a good amount in each area I did harvest from. I didn’t do the work to grow them, and I don’t think it’s really my right to wipe everything clean and leave the birds and other animals with nothing. Responsible harvesting high fives all around.

On Thursday I came in, rinsed the berries, and plucked all the little stems out of them. My water was pretty dirty only because my bucket had some dried dirt it in before I started. Next time I will definitely use a clean bucket. It will significantly cut the rinsing steps down.

On Friday I knew it was time to turn it into jam, or at least that was my intention. After boiling the berries down for about 20 minutes, in order to make them easier to pit through a food mill, I realized this stuff would be great as a fruit butter.

I boiled berries on the front burner so I could mill them, and then added the puree to the back burner to cook down.

On the other side of the stove I had the jars sterilizing and the tops and lids slightly simmering.

The entire time I was doing this and experimenting with sugar/pectin/lemon, I was video chatting with Lauren over at Filing Jointly. Let me tell you something about Lauren—she’s great. She also thinks she awkward and she’s not. I feel like a lot of people who blog feel like they are awkward in person and more dynamic online. I even feel like this. I know I’m awkward, but I embrace it. Have you seen the video of me making spaghetti sauce? Lauren can probably testify to my a.) talkative nature and b.) awkward movements. I can testify to her awesomeness. Also, you all should encourage her to write about the pig farm story. It’s great.

That said, she pretty much just watched this process live. There really isn’t much of recipe but I’ll give a general breakdown. It’s a pretty typical fruit butter recipe I’d say. When it sets up it will look like a jam from the outside, but once you open it give it a quick stir and it quickly becomes butter consistency and nothing like jam.

Autumn Olive Butter Recipe

Remember, this is a “more or less” recipe. I’ve made jam before so I just sort of winged this and knew it would either be butter or jam, with my hope being for a soft butter/spread. Mine became butter because I was stingy on the pectin, and the mash is already very butter like on it’s own. You can easily make a small batch of this by just milling your berries, adding a little sweetner and moving on. The recipe below is for canning it, which requires more sugar and some citrus to be safe. I also realized it takes a TON of sugar to make it sweet once you add more than a tablespoon of lemon juice, I had added two and it was harshly tart. Next time I may just stick with less lemon juice, and plain sugar.

  • 8 to 9 or so cups berry mash (food mill to remove pits)
  • Few teaspoons of lemon juice. Be careful and add slow, the berries are very tart. The more lemon you add, the more sugar you need to add to offset it. You need a certain amount of citrus though, especially if you’re water bathing. A professional will have more advice than me on this, but I always do it as a precaution.
  • 2 cups white sugar
  • 1/2 cup maple syrup
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • Few tablespoons powder pectin. I used ball and some new kind. I really recommend sure jell if you want this to be more like a jam. Follow the directions on your own pectin for best results.

Follow proper procedures to making fruit butter and for canning per the National Center for Home Food Preservation. Butter recipes for canning can be found lots of places like Balls Complete Book of Home Preservation. Process according to your altitude. I boiled the fruit until it coated my spoon and came off in a sheet and processed once it reached a rolling boil for about 10-15 minutes. I’m not a professional canner and I don’t want to give you information that may be considered inaccurate because of botulism and other goodies that can grow if not preserved appropriately and will make you very sick, so please please please consult with the National Center if you don’t know how to can, or need more accurate instructions. 

Saving Autumn Olives For Fruit Smoothies

When you mill autumn olives to remove the pits, the mash will look an awful lot like a smoothie in consistency. The next day when it sets it will feel like a firm pudding, or as my childhood memories remind me – Nickelodeons Gak. Given how good these berries are for you, and the natural consistency of their mash, I am going to process more of these and freeze them into ice cube trays. I’ll then vacuum seal the frozen berry mash cubes into bags with about 4-5 in each bag. I’ll use these in place of ice cubes when I make smoothies.

Autumn Olive Frozen Fruit Butter

Given the natural smoothie butter consistency of the mash, it makes perfectly good sense to me that if the mash freezes and thaws well, I could easily thaw one or two cubes of mash and mix it with a little maple syrup to make a really nice spread for toast. I’m interested in testing this method with the cubes vacuum sealed to protect against freezer burn, but I’m glad I preserved a batch too.

Autumn Olive Cake Topping

This sounds ridiculous but it is *so darn good*. I recently made a banana molasses spice cake and man oh man, the butter I made and preserved is ridiculous with it. Not only is it super tasty, it sits and holds really well. This would make a great spread in between layers because it will soak into the cake without totally soaking in. I wouldn’t use it on the sides because it would slip off. I’m sure the fresh mash could be doctored into a stiff frosting, but lets face it that is way out of my jurisdiction as I’m a pantry baker at best.

My final opinion…

Make it. Eat it. Love it. I think I love the mash best on it’s own with just a little sweetner, if I’m being entirely honest. I just don’t like taking something so healthy for you and ruining it with so much sugar. I bet I could make it with a lot less sugar if I upped the pectin. That might be the next trial. That doesn’t mean I won’t lick clean every jar I preserved already though. I will. Oh, I will.

xo,

Heather

P.S. Winnie was eating rearing off the ground and jumping for the berries her nose deemed best. Good God, I love these dogs.

Peter Pipers Pickling Party {Dill Relish & Bread and Butter Slices}

I need to figure out Peter Piper’s method for was growing veggies he could pick a peck of  that were already pickled. Until then, August is pickling season. Once again our garden has inundated us with mass quantities of cucumbers, within the last week. So I spent this past rainy Sunday in the kitchen processing about 14+ pounds of cucumbers. First up was 8 pounds of relish, and then about a gallon of bread and butter pickles. This is the first year I made relish, and it was a great way to use up the cucumbers that weren’t up to par for pickles.

My most favorite addition to this years harvest has hands down been my mandolin. It’s really important keep your pickles uniform so they heat evenly, and the mandolin allowed me to get slices of the same thickness.

For the recipes on this post I used the Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving. This post is in no way paid for/sponsored by Ball, I just think they are a really great source. If you’re unfamiliar with home preservation techniques, I suggest you read the book and do some research. It’s extremely important your fruit is washed and unblemished, your jars are sterilized and your kitchen is clean before you start with everything laid out as you need it. The last thing you want is any sort of bacterial introduction, and/or to be running around grabbing things when you’re ladling hot liquids.

Dill Pickle Relish (taken from Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving)

  • 8 pounds cucumbers
  • 1/2 cup picking/sea salt (do not use table salt for canning, ever)
  • 2 tsp ground tumeric
  • 4 cups water
  • 2 1/2 cups finely chopped onions (I found a mandolin worked great for this)
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 tbsp dill seeds (I had no dill seeds, so I used a hefty portion of dried dill. I really wanted super dill relish though. Remember whatever you use will get stronger over time).
  • 4 cups white vinegar (about 5% acidity)

Directions (abbreviated from Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving, with notes from myself added in)

1. Finely chop cucumbers in small batches, transferring to a glass or stainless bowl as you finish. A food processor works great for this. Sprinkle with pickling salt and tumeric. Cover with water and place in fridge for about 2 hours.

2. Drain cucumbers and rinse thoroughly. Press extra water out with your hands in small batches. I initially use a couple books to press the water out.

3. Prepare canner, jars and lids.
4. Combine vinegar, dill, sugar and onions in large saucepan. Add in drained cucumbers. Bring to boil over medium-high heat. Reduce and boil gently, stirring to prevent sticking. Do this until slightly thickened and vegetables are heated through. This will take about 10 minutes to reduce.

5. Ladle hot relish into jars leaving 1/2 inch of headspace. Wipe rim, and seal handtight. My advice is to only fill one jar at a time and seal. Don’t leave the jar uncovered once filled.
6. Place jars back in the canner, until completely covered with water. Once the water is at a full rolling boil again, time for 15 minutes (this will depending on your altitude, research proper processing times for your area). Wait 5 minutes, remove jars and cool. Do not tilt jars to dump water off the top when you pull them out. This water will quickly evaporate.
Store in a cool dry place and give a few months for optimal taste, though it can be eaten within a few days.

Bread and Butter Pickles (adapted from Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving)

  • 10 cups sliced pickling cucumbers
  • 5 small onions, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup Kosher salt
  • 3 cups white vinegar
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon celery seed
  • 2 tablespoons mustard seeds
 Directions (seriously abbreviated from Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving, with notes from myself added in)
1. Slide onions thinly and cucumbers into rounds of the similar size – this is where a mandoline comes in super handy! Combine cucumbers, onions, salt in a glass or ceramic bowl. Cover with water and let sit at room temperature for 2 hours. I cover with plastic wrap to keep anything out of the mix.
2. Rinse the cucumbers then drain thoroughly.
3. Combine vinegar, sugar, turmeric, celery seed and mustard seed in a large pot until sugar is dissolved. Bring to a boil over medium heat.
4.  Turn to low, add the cucumbers and heat through, about 10 minutes. Do not boil. Turn heat off if using gas, or remove from burner if using electric heat. At this point they will already taste pretty much awesome.
5. Add cucumber first to the jars and then fill with pickling liquid to cover pickles. Leave a generous 1/2 inch headspace.  Clean rims, add hot lids and rings. Process about 15 minutes in a hot water bath at a full boil. Remember “processing time” doesn’t start until it hits full boil.

After a long day in the kitchen over boiling water and vinegar, in the middle of August, I was ready for nothing except to take a shower. So tomorrow’s lunch will be almond butter and jelly. {If you lost me – I normally make lunch for the next day at night, and I was done with the kitchen}.

I’m shuddering looking at all of the equally green tomato’s in the garden.  I may need to nip this in the butt and make some green tomato salsa.

Ok, in all reality – I love it. I love not having to buy this stuff. I love having on the go gifts. I love putting up produce we grow and harvest right in our back yard. A garden is a great thing to have.

Happy Pickling,
Heather

Mason Jar Wedding Invitation Set – DIY Template

Update: January 29, 2015

Unfortunately someone peed in the pool, in fact, multiple people have peed in the pool and so the pool party is over. It will never cease to amaze me how one person believes it’s okay to steal another persons design and then portray them as their own, and profit off of them. It’s straight up unethical.

Thank you to everyone who has used my design responsibility for their events. I truly appreciate it. However, the only place you may now find this design for download is through The Wedding Chicks.  I have given them exclusive permission to offer the designs for free. Unfortunately this means the file is no longer editable to use for any other purpose than a wedding.

I’m sorry everyone to shut the pool down. It just hurts my heart too much to see other people ripping my designs off for a profit, when I, as the creator, don’t even sell them for a profit. So, with that said, I have removed all downloadable files below, information on what fonts were used, and how to edit these. I have also watermarked the images so they cannot be lifted and manipulated easily within a program.

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PLEASE NOTE PRIOR TO USE: This design is for personal use only and may not be downloaded, used, or altered in anyway for commercial use. This design is Creative Commons protected – as noted at the end of this post. Wedding Chicks is the only vendor with an agreement to use this design commercially. Wedding Chicks will be notified of listings found to be using any part of this design for profit. All blogs who wish to offer this template, or a version of it, for free are welcome to do so with clear and proper acknowledgement and a link back to this blog.

Unauthorized replications of designs, for profit or for free without acknowledgement, is disheartening and disrespectful to the intent of this design and to all designers who work hard to produce original content. For those that have used this template personally and have loved it, thank you so much for your support. I choose to believe the majority of people who use this are doing so personally and the notes I’ve received of gratefulness are the reasons I’m still keeping this download up for now. Thank you again.

Lesson: Don’t pee in the pool, it ruins the fun for everyone.

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I have a confession.

I bought our wedding invitations before we were even engaged. I guess I should back it up and say that we would have been engaged by then had I not lost my job. We just couldn’t merit that kind of money at that point. A couple months later once I got a new job, we got engaged.

So really, while unemployed with lack of cash flow, what inspired me to get invitations suddenly? The price.

You might want to sit down.

Sitting?

Good.

The story goes as follows: Go to staples for soap business supplies, take a look at clearance table to see if there is anything on it I can use, see wedding invitations. Marked down from $40 a box to $7.50 for 50 invites – I can deal with not loving the design (plain with a tiny bouquet of flowers on top). I scoop up a few more boxes than I expect to use,  just incase.

I get to the cash register and I nearly fall over giggling with pure joy and shock. Then I do some sort of Top Gun high-five with the guy behind me in line (okay, I didn’t but it crossed my mind). Why all the celebration? They rang up as .50 cents a box. I confirm the price and gleefully skip out of the store with all wedding invitations for $2.50 cents and a savings of $197.50.

When Mr. A walks in the door I bubble over about my find.  Through the look of utter confusion and gears turning in his head, I get approval. We’ve been together for almost 6 years at this point, he’s really not too baffled by my antics, and was impressed by the savings.

I spent all of yesterday designing and figuring out the wedding and rsvp design since they do need to go out this month. We have a mason jar theme (much like my life). I designed the outline of the jar, in my vector editor, after a picture I found because mason jar pictures so hard to come across. Okay, that was slightly sarcastic.

So without further ado, the invitation set. Cost?  $0.01 cent each (not including labor or ink).

The invitation was printed and cut around to leave a small border. The invitation paper was off-white with tiny flowers on top. I lined these up to print below the flower design and chopped it right off.

The RSVP’s took a while to figure out how I wanted them worded. When it came down to it, I wanted a cute front that incorporated the jars and went for an nontraditional approach to the wording on the back.

So how did I format the wording for these? Mad-Lib style!

I am excited about these and can’t wait to get them all printed and sent out in the mail. I have to confirm the time with the church first but once that’s done my printer won’t know what hit it.

Oh, and if you did the math ($2.50/.50 cents a box = 5 boxes*50 per box = 250) we don’t have nearly 250  people as it turns out. We went with about 100 less than that. Thank God.

Happy Wedding Crafting!

Heather

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DOWNLOAD INSTRUCTIONS:

Due to stealing of this design for profit, all downloads and download instructions have been removed. The Creative Commons license for this design remains in effect. This design is for personal use only. No commercial uses or for clients. Reproductions must be attributed back to Like A Cup of Tea. Please see Creative Commons License below.

Creative Commons License
Mason Jar Invitations by Like A Cup Of Tea is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.